• Students should be able to identify, differentiate, and summarize concepts characteristic of the major subdisciplines of the study of language including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, and neurolinguistics.
  • Students should be able to identify and explain the role of areas of the human anatomy and their linguistic function, including areas of the vocal tract and brain.
  • Students should be able to recognize and explain the interrelationship between language universals and the arbitrary nature of language.
  • Students should be able to apply principles of linguistic analysis to English and non-English language data presented in instructional supplements, the textbook, and/or researched or collected by the student.
  • Students should be able to plan, prepare, and produce a final linguistic research report, which may consist of original data collection and analysis and/or collection and analysis of language data and/or research from the literature of the field.

 

GLENDALE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

COURSE ASSESSMENT REPORT

SEMESTER/YEAR: Spring 2008

DEPARTMENT: Credit ESL

COURSE TITLE: Linguistics 101: Introduction to Language and Linguistics

PARTICIPANTS (min. 2):

Dr. Kathleen Flynn

Dr. Forrest Fordyce

COURSE-LEVEL SLO(s) ASSESSED THIS SEMESTER:

#4 (of 5): Students should be able to apply principles of linguistic analysis to English and non-English language data presented in instructional supplements, the textbook, and/or researched or collected by the student.

METHODS OF ASSESSMENT:

Final Examination: Three linguistic problems with language data-sets, including English and other languages, which require critical thinking and application of principles of linguistic analysis were assessed. The percentage of correct responses (defined as 70% of each problem answered correctly) was calculated for each problem. These three problems represented 33% of the final examination (with the remainder as multiple choice items). The analysis of the three problems yielded the following result:



N=32

# of students achieving 70% correct response to problem (i.e., successful)

# of students not achieving 70% mastery of problem

% of class successful

% of ling. problem section of exam each problem represents

% of final exam grade problem represents

Problem #1

28

4

87%

60%

20%

Problem #2

7

26

22%

24%

8%

Problem #3

31

1

97%

16%

5%

TOTAL

66

31

73%*

100%

33%

(* weighted to percent problem section of exam)

ANALYSIS OF ASSESSMENT: What do these results tell you about your students' achievements on the targeted SLO(s)?

While the problems selected for the exam evidenced varying degrees of successful responses, taken as a whole the students demonstrated achievement of the SLO. This is a relatively strong result given that Problem #1 consisted of non-Western language data for which comparative (reconstructive) analysis was required. The other two problems focused on English-language data.

PLAN: Indicate if your assessment results reveal a need for course improvement in order to improve student achievement, and what plans your department will make to do so.

Although the results are within the range of acceptability, data-sets and the type of linguistic problems will naturally be varied from semester to semester. This will allow demonstration of student achievement of the SLO under various data conditions and types of analysis in the future.









 

Last updated: 9/28/2011 10:17:53 AM